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BJ73 - vm head gasket and other bits


 
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outdoordan
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 68
Location: France

PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:08    Post subject: BJ73 - vm head gasket and other bits Reply with quote

Hi all... new in here ... in fact (very) new chuffed owner of a 91 BJ73 in remarkably good nick... so I thought I'd say hello and beg for some help/advice. The only snag with the BJ is I have to do cylinder heads (not checked to see if they're warped yet. I've been assured they're not and only no.2 had gone).

Anyway. The engine is a VM95 2.5TD.

(I'm going to get it going... if it conks out again I'll replace it, but for now I want to make my own mind up about whether its as sh*t as everyone says).

While the water pump is off and being reconditioned I want to flush the whole cooling system. So first question:

Is there anything I should/shouldn't add to the water to make sure the whole system is free from crud?

Second question regarding oil (engine has done 140,000kms)

Which oil. Want to use the best available. Recommendations?

Third question:

Not had a good rummage yet but have been told that there is a steel elbow which fits between the turbo and the exhaust which is broken. This needs welding or replacing. Id like to replace it. Does anyone know the part number or could suplly an exploded diagram of the exhaust system? Or know where I could buy one

Last question:

Never changed a cambelt on one of these before... could anyone help with a procedure/instructions?


Thanks everyone. will post pickies as soon as I get the thing off the trailer and into the shed.

OD
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J66P
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Joined: 21 Apr 2010
Posts: 439
Location: Doncaster

PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 10:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

first off the VM unit is ok if looked after, not by Toyota standards but its as good as many units out there

you MUST maintain the cooling system for sure, change anti freeze, keep radiator clean etc....

as for oil just use a good grade Td oil,

The steel pipe will be the gas recirculation pipe and I think its stainles so may struggle to get it welded anyway (it is on the Jeeps)
_________________
1998 Toyota Landcruiser Colorado 3.4 V6 (sold)
2001 VW 2.8 V6 Caravelle Surf Bus (sold)
2010 Passat Bluemotion Highline Plus (gone)
VW Amarok BiTdi
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Huw
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Joined: 28 Sep 2009
Posts: 195
Location: Near Aberystwyth, W. Wales

PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2010 15:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

The engine is a good, well engineered and long lasting unit as long as it has not been boiled due to lack of coolant. The heads are prone to go soft if cooked.
There is a special procedure to torque them down, including a final tightening after a thousand miles or so running.
There is no timing belt. IIRC there is no chain either.

Oil change interval should be every 6000 miles using an SHPD oil meeting ACEA E3 as a minimum. 15w/40 viscosity.
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1998 100 series diesel 1HD-FTE with about 170,000 miles and counting. Active suspension.
Pioneer touchscreen sat-nav and entertainment system fitted.
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outdoordan
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 68
Location: France

PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 8:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks fellas.

Huw... do you know where best to locate engine schematics? CHG fitting procedure (torque settings, tightening sequence etc)

Apparently the unit was run with a knackered water pump and no.2 started blowing when it overheated. I've been told (by the seller) that the failure wasn't catastrophic, the engine wasn't "cooked" and the head in question doesn't need skimming. hmm?
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Huw
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Joined: 28 Sep 2009
Posts: 195
Location: Near Aberystwyth, W. Wales

PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 11:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

outdoordan wrote:
thanks fellas.

Huw... do you know where best to locate engine schematics? CHG fitting procedure (torque settings, tightening sequence etc)

Apparently the unit was run with a knackered water pump and no.2 started blowing when it overheated. I've been told (by the seller) that the failure wasn't catastrophic, the engine wasn't "cooked" and the head in question doesn't need skimming. hmm?


I have the Land Rover repair manual for the similar 2.4 which has individual rocker covers. Yours will have one or two covers only for all heads. Unfortunately I do not know, hold on.... maybe. Land Rover have repair manuals on line. You have to register but you can access them by the day if I remember correctly, but you do have to pay a small fee. I do not know whether the VM is on the system as it was last used by LR around 1991 in 2.5 litre indirect injection form. It has been used by Rover and Jeep since then and before then also by GM/Vauxhall in the Fronterra.

FWIW my opinion is if it has overheated and the head gasket has gone, I would expect the worse for that head. How does the seller know unless he has had the head off, and if he has had it off, why has he not repaired it properly?
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1998 100 series diesel 1HD-FTE with about 170,000 miles and counting. Active suspension.
Pioneer touchscreen sat-nav and entertainment system fitted.
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outdoordan
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 68
Location: France

PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 12:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks Huw.


the heads are off the engine and everything is bagged up. There are four individual rocker box covers. I'll have a rummage this evening for a serial number

just by the way... i want to bleed and refill the hydraulic clutch tonight but dont have a spec for the fluid. any thoughts.

cheers
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outdoordan
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 68
Location: France

PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 12:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

just found this:


Is your clutch moaning, clicking or otherwise sounding unhealthy when you depress the pedal? If you have ruled out the clutch assembly itself, you likely need to replace the clutch master cylinder and / or the clutch slave cylinder. For a small investment in a remanufactured unit, new replacement unit or a rebuild kit, we�ll show you how easy it is to swap out the offending hydraulic assembly for better actuation of your clutch and assure longer life of the disk assembly.

Tools Needed
First the proper tools:


Tools Needed
Flare Nut Wrenches � 10 MM
10 and 12 MM sockets, regular and deep wall
10MM Combination Wrench
1/4 and 3/8 Ratchet Handles
Various extensions
Various pliers � Needlenose, Side Cutters, Linesman, Water Pump
�One � Man� Brake Bleeding Kit
SAE J1703 or FMVSS No. 116 DOT 3 Brake Fluid - WARNING: Brake fluid will remove paint from any surface that it comes in contact with!
Flashlight(s)
Fluids Drain Pan
This job should take approximately one to one and a half hours.






Master Cylinder

Remove the lower portion of the dash (four 10MM bolts on a third generation 4Runner) and the associated wiring plugs, cables, etc. Take care to list or photograph the assemblies in the assembled condition if you feel that you can�t keep track of �what goes where.� Removing the panel is necessary unless you have the hands of a three year old and the arms of Manute Bol.

Remove the cotter pin holding the cross pin through the clutch pedal and push the cross pin through the pedal assembly. You may need to depress the pedal slightly to release the tension off of the cross pin. Retain the cotter pin and the cross pin, these will be re-used in the replacement process.

Under the hood, remove the necessary items to gain access to the clutch master cylinder. When removing vacuum hoses, again be careful to label or photograph the location of each hose removed to avoid confusion during re-assembly. Once you have gained access to the master cylinder, start by removing the hydraulic line fitting (flare nut) with the 10MM flare nut wrench. Save yourself a great deal of time, effort and possible additional expense, use a flare nut wrench ONLY on hydraulic fittings. With a drain pan under the assembly, loosen the fitting until you can remove the flare nut and gently pull the tube from the master cylinder. Now, using the 12MM deep wall socket and the necessary extensions, remove the nuts holding the master cylinder to the firewall. Use caution removing the nuts when at the end of the mounting stud so as not to drop the nuts into the recesses of the frame / body.

When replacing the master cylinder with a new unit, align the two on a bench and roughly adjust the �free play� length to approximately equal length. This will make the final adjustment easier.

Replace the old master cylinder with the new or newly overhauled master cylinder in reverse order of the disassembly with the exception of the cotter pin that retains the cross pin. Torque values are unnecessary in this assembly, the common rule of �tighten until snug and one sixteenth / eighth turn� applies well here, however, the proper torque values are:

9 FT LBS for the mounting nuts
11 FT LBS for the master cylinder flare fitting nut
CAUTION: Do not depress the clutch pedal at this time!

Lower Dash Assembly removed for access View of Engine compartment access required Cotter Pin and Cross Pin from Clutch Pedal Assembly

Slave Cylinder

The area in which the slave cylinder is placed is very close fit, but common hand tools will work. A special tool (a crow�s foot flare nut adapter) is recommended by the service manual, but I have found that a regular combo flare nut wrench will work in the area affected.

Placing the drain pan under the assembly, remove the flare nut fitting using the flare nut wrench. Some contortionist moves are required here, but 40 year old fat hands can get to it. Allow the fluid to drain in the pan. Using a 12MM socket and different extensions, remove the two retaining bolts from the transmission housing. The slave cylinder simply pulls away from the housing.

Replace the old slave cylinder with the new or newly overhauled slave cylinder in reverse order of the disassembly.


Slave Cylinder view - Tight, Tight, Tight!
CAUTION: Only slight depressing of the slave cylinder is necessary for installation, try not to �bottom out� the assembly; it is still contaminated with air.
CAUTION: Use a light touch when tightening the bolts into the transmission housing. The housing is made of aluminum and the threads are tapped directly into the case.
As in the case of the master cylinder, torque values are not necessary but the specification is as follows:

9 FT LBS for the mounting nuts
11 FT LBS for the slave cylinder flare fitting nut
8 FT LBS for the slave cylinder bleeder screw

Bleeding the System

Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the limit indicator with SAE J1703 or FMVSS No. 116 DOT 3 Fluid. Connect the flush (hose) line of the �one-Man� bleeder system to the bleeder screw on the slave cylinder. Loosen the bleeder screw to a slightly open position.

Depress the clutch pedal. The pedal assembly will likely sink to the floor; this is the start of the bleeding process. Continue to cycle the pedal (approx. 10 stokes) and check for resistance in the pedal feel and fluid level in the master cylinder. Do not let the master cylinder cycle without fluid. When the pedal returns to it�s normal position and the fluid level in the master cylinder is normal, turn the bleeder screw on the slave cylinder to the �wide open� position and allow the system to gravity bleed (assuring fluid is free of air bubbles.) Tighten bleeder screw when fluid is clear of air, fill the master cylinder to the mid-point (nominal) level as indicated by the min. / max. lines on the reservoir then replace the float and cap.


Adjusting Pedal Free Play
Using hand pressure, push the clutch pedal assembly in (actuation) and note the amount of movement until you feel resistance. This is �Pedal Free Play.�

Using a tape measure or a combination square, find a spot on the floor or firewall that you can locate repetitively with the end of the rule. Measure the free play from the floor to the top of the clutch pedal. The specification is .197 to .591 inches (roughly 1/4 to 1/2 inch). If the assembly is within the range, replace the cotter pin through the cross pin and proceed to the Final Assembly / Test.

If the free play is not to specification, you will need to adjust the pushrod on the master cylinder. Loosen the nut on the adjustment screw (located on the master cylinder pushrod) slightly. Remove the cross pin from the clutch pedal and rotate the pushrod to the approximate length needed to meet the free play measurement. Re-install the cross pin and measure the free play. Adjust until specified measurement is met then install the cotter pin to the cross pin and tighten the retaining nut on the pushrod.


Final Assembly / Test

Move the clutch pedal through its range several times while checking the hydraulic line fittings for leakage, tighten as necessary to seal any leaks.

Re-assemble the lower dash panel, check all electrical / mechanical connections prior to bolting the dash panel in place.

Assuring that the truck is in an area that is free of any buildings, danger of a collision, etc. put the transmission out of gear, depress the clutch and start the engine. Release the clutch while the transmission is out of gear to assure proper engagement / disengagement. Depress the clutch again and shift the transmission in gear and release the clutch. Move at idle speed to assure that the clutch is fully engaged. Drive around the block using all the forward gears while noting the engagement of the shifting. Stop and engage reverse. When assured that all is well, park and inspect the system one more time for leaks and proper fluid level.

If the clutch does not engage normally throughout its operation, the free pedal adjustment is not correct, the system has not been bled properly (i.e. air remains in the hydraulic system), the components were not installed properly or the wrong components were installed. Go through each step of the installation, checking and adjusting as necessary until the clutch engages smoothly.

Once everything is completed satisfactorily, park your truck in its proper spot and open can of favorite beverage, you are finished and have successfully repaired the hydraulic clutch system on your Toyota!
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outdoordan
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Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 68
Location: France

PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2010 13:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

breaking news.... master and slave cylinders removed. looking for re con ones.
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vmkrister
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Joined: 08 May 2015
Posts: 6
Location: Uppsala, Sweden

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 12:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

The VM95A in some BJ73 have gears from crankshaft to all other units, i.e. no cam belt or chain!
Any standard oil will do - just change it and oil filter regularly - I use 6000 km between changes.
NEVER overheat the engine and let it even out in temperature if it is very hot - otherwise the heat will go up in the heads and they will crack inside...
Krister
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