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Pulling a 40 tonner up a big hill in the snow with an 80

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Juddian
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Joined: 31 Jan 2015
Posts: 352
Location: Homeboy

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2021 4:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attn Jasonix.
A tip for you re grip levels.

First of all drop all the air out of the trailer aibags, yes the lot.
Secondly dump the air out of the second steer axle if you have one.
Thirdly raise the tractor unit suspension as high as possible.
This combination will raise the weight imposed on the drive axle from roughly 9 tons to around 15 tons or over depending on vehicle type when loaded if you are driving a typical 6 axle 44 tonner running full weight.
Obviously you can't drive home like this but it can make the difference between getting up a slope and going home rather than being stuck for hours.

Not sure how much difference it will make in an empty scenario, and doing this won't make much difference to the steer axle still imposing around 6 tons, its that steer axle which causes your empty running issues cos itys the heaviest axle fo all when empty, but worth a shot.
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2021 4:32    Post subject: Google Ads keep this community free to join!


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Tractionman
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Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 608
Location: Bournemouth, Dorset

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2021 16:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

Although this is an old thread, and the Scania driver will most likely never read it, some good tips there Jud, as we've been there.
Raising the tag axle so further weight is transferred to drive axle, using diff lock and low gear/crawler all helps too. Empty is never good in those conditions, mole hills can give traction problems. Too much power in modern trucks is not necessarily a good thing here, and a light foot is definately needed. Give me an old school f88 any day ! 🤔
Is that one of your trailers on contract Juddian ? 😃
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Juddian
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Joined: 31 Jan 2015
Posts: 352
Location: Homeboy

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2021 17:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tractionman.

Luckily i keep the same trailer 99% of the time.

As for grip, i've had brilliant vehicles and some that would get stuck on 1/2'' of snow on a flat road.
Best artic for snow grip was a 6 x 2 square Axor (manual) sat on Remoulds, 6" of snow it just laufghed at, barely a s lip let alone worry about getting stuck.
Few days before or after, the same winter, i'm in a 6 x 2 MAN auto which managed to get stuck on that 1/2" of snow and whilst attempting to rock the heap back and forth the gearbox overheated and shut down, wonderful.
Don't ask me why the vast difference in available grip between the two.

Best normal lorry for grip was an FL12 wagon and drag, again that just dug in and went.
My favourite motors though for snow driving are 6 or 8 wheel tippers/rolonoffs with double drive, unstoppable, Scammell Constructor i drove at one time i swear would go anywhere the track layer compactor could go.

Diff locks i never found particularly handy for road use, any wheelspin would see the vehicle sway sideways pivoting on the steer axle, quickest route to a jack knife (grip, not braking) situation.

Should be interesting when i find some snow this year, the set of tyres my work truck is currently on are snowflake stamped, despite wearing not particularly well (soft compound) the wet grip from this set has been the best in truck tyres i've experienced for probably 3 decades, so will be really interesting to see how they perform in the snow.

Speaking of which, as i type this its snowing like billio outside, but i'm off tomorrow so someone else's problem...what's that you ask? the sun shines on the righteous, well maybe, or the devil looks after his own  Twisted Evil
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Tractionman
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Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 608
Location: Bournemouth, Dorset

PostPosted: Sun Nov 28, 2021 19:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jud,
Yeah it depends on your luck/skill on the day sometimes in snow and the like. Been trapped in a long layby off the road up in Barrow, when a bender got hooked on my trailer trying to get out in snow. A good time was had by all there.
A bit tongue in cheek my remark about the trailer given the name on the side. 😁
I preferred to keep my own traiker too, like the unit, you come to know it and are in tune with the rig as a whole. Most companies prefer one outfit/vehicle/driver too, doesnt always work that way wjith the larger trunkers though. That way they know who is accountable for any damage/poor driving detrimental to the vehicle, although the dreaded spy in the cab can give a good idea of the way its being driven
Some of our experiences seem the same. I never really got on with MAN in the early days, things have changed a lot since.
Had a demonstrator when they first started getting a profile over here and wasn't impressed, if you missed a gear it reverted to neutral and wouldn't 're engage until you stopped despite the revs dropping off rapidly and double declutching - well handy uphill on motorway if you got baulked in the middle lane. Yet an old, (even then) Mandator, I drove back from Manchester empty with no clutch, knocking it out of stick when stopping, then re starting in gear. Like using kangaroo juice !
The f88 I had was a 6 legger wagon and drag, that was as sure footed as anything and up and down Shap doing Scotch on the old road then. I think the f10/f12 were the f88/f89 successors, so not surprised a lot of good stuff transferred across.
Tippers, yep great, drove various AEC models from the Southall factory, and later they were lumped in with Scammel Watford.
If you've ever seen that film Hell Drivers, I can equate with some of that.
Of course choice of tyres can make or break even our cruisers, although I'm not particularly reminded of any really *beep* ones when tramping. Ive done my long apprenticeship, where I had to work my way up, sometimes scraping the ice from the inside before setting off ! Take care out there mate. 🤗
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